Retirement

Finding the best Part Time Employment after Retirement



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It is a well known fact that life expectancy, for most people, is longer than it once was. More people now reach retirement age fully fit and healthy enough to continue working, if they wish to do so.

Some of the people who have already retired from their full-time occupation may want to seek part-time employment, to supplement their unearned income, or because from a fear of being too isolated or feeling unfulfilled, without the requirement of going to work.

No-one reaches retirement without having gained a lot of life experience and knowledge. The mature part-time job-seeker can be more discerning about the type of job they want to do. It could be something connected to their personal preferences, interests and expertise. For example, a woman who has brought up her own children may wish to work with other people's children, as a child-minder or care-worker; someone who has an interest and pride in their own locality could seek part-time work at a local tourist office or visitor attraction.

If gaining new employment requires further training or qualifications, it is never to late for anyone to qualify for such work. It is not true to say that learning is easier when you are young. There are many examples of mature students who left school at a young age with no educational qualifications, who have successfully gain formal qualifications in later life.

Some senior job-seekers fear rejection from employers simply because of their age. Age discrimination may not be lawful but it will always exist. Someone in charge of a glitzy new bar or a trendy fashion store is unlikely to want to employ anyone much older than their target customers. On the other hand, many employers recognize that mature people are generally more reliable in the workplace. They are usually more motivated to stay loyal to the company than someone young, ambitious or easily bored.

For whatever reason a retired person is seeking new part-time employment, they should really be looking for something relevant to their own interests and life experience. This will result in better job satisfaction and will be of considerable benefit to the employer.

There are many good opportunities for part-time employment of enthusiastic, motivated and interesting sem-retired people. The best opportunities available are probably with local employers, with small businesses, freelance work, relief work and any job which requires good communication skills. These are the types of job which are often done better by a mature person than someone straight out of school.

The retired person who wants to work part-time should take time and be patient in looking for new employment opportunities. They do exist, and can be found.

 

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